I've noticed in using Mastodon that I'd rather start with a toots-only view (i.e. no boosts) and then want to check the boosts feed. For that matter, I wish a link to Boosts were visible on the timeline screens. Anyone else use it this way, where they only want to see boosts some of the time?

Do not track? Yes. Very good.

Now give me Do not app!

/I don't want the app.
//I knew you had one
///seriously, you won't even set a cookie?

Isn't it funny how often things that should be simple can get flipped and become anything but?

Here we have a simple faucet with hot and cold water, but in the common case that it takes a while for hot water to appear, one wonders which way for cold?

Is it up because the handle should go in the direction of the blue dot or down so that the blue dot is brought into some position relative to the base?

streaming a hintjens talk, coding more on web of trust, but mostly hanging out

twitch.tv/aptact

When compared with centralized services, federated social networking has brought you _______ conversations which are of _______ quality.

Had a really nice hangout this morning with folks from @ohn and it was really fun! It's great to meet new people and realize that maybe I'm making new friends.

It also got me thinking about richness of social interaction and humanity where at one extreme we operate in text and emojis while at the other end we can spend time together in the same physical space with no tech required.

In this light, Open Hospitality Network (openhospitality.network/) is taking on perhaps the hardest kind of technology project where people use this tech intentionally to connect with real people.

What if the social platforms we use, instead of suggesting we follow celebrities to increase engagement, saw that we're spending an unhealthy amount of time in a low-quality medium and suggested we pick up the phone or arrange a video chat or meetup?

With the #CouchSurfing article trending on Hacker News now, the @ohn folks have posted a link to #OpenHospitalityNetwork website.

If you don't know OHN, be sure to check it out. It is one of the cooler #ActivityPub projects with lotsa potential to bring multiple HospEx platforms to the #Fediverse

news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2

#BeWelcome already has an open issue since 2018: github.com/BeWelcome/rox/issue

#TrustRoots already has an issue as well: github.com/Trustroots/trustroo

#OpenHospitalityNetwork already has a fork of Trustroots who is working on adding ActivityPub: github.com/OpenHospitalityNetw

Tagging @weex because I see them in the issues there already

Excellent graphic in De Volkskrant today. Who infects who? The top labels are Source, with unvaccinated on the left and vaccinated on the right, the side labels are Recipient, with vaccinated on top and unvaccinated on bottom.

In the interest of furthering standards discussion and development on the Fediverse, I'm proposing a change to SocialHub.

socialhub.activitypub.rocks/t/

I didn't know Clive Sinclair.

I do know what he accomplished.

He broke the cost barrier to entry to a new world. For $99 in 1981 you could have a personal computer kit that allowed you to write code in BASIC... for $149 you could buy the finished computer. This connected to a TV, and a casette deck, and you had not just a learning platform, but one with what would become THE hacker aesthetic.

You could have a $1300 Apple, or this... frankly, looking back... i'm glad I couldn't afford the Apple... this was so much better.

1.5 million of the ZX81 were sold. I had one.

The more hackers I speak to sinceClive's passing, the more I realize how many hackers were born because of his computers. Clive's devices launched thousands of us, and changed the whole world.

I think Clive knew how important those little black boxes with the membrane keyboards were, but I don't know that he knew how big the ripples would be.

My first computer, and people like Weld Pond's too... the L0pht existed because of Sinclair's machine... hackers.town as well.

From there, the impacts are well documented...

Rest well Sir, you earned it. We'll aspire to titanic things too, and take it from here.

@nightpool @dansup @yala @humanetech @liaizon @tchambers @grishka @mike @weex @sl007 This discussion is interesting as well, since different types of people come together: The pragmatic ones and the perfectionists and inventors. I consider myself a pragmatic person who just implements existing ideas, but does not invents. So my (already implemented) idea for groups is just like the way gup.pe is working: People can create posts, mentioning the group, the group will then repeat this post to their followers. This is working well with many AP implementations.

On the other hand there are the people who think that a group actor shouldn't be treated like a personal actor. And groups should do more than redistributing posts.

This is a quite interesting discussion. I'm not participating that much there. Mostly since I already said how we are doing it. And I guess I will then have a look at the result and have a look if it can be implemented as well. Like I said: I'm an implementer 馃榾

I lik this post from @agateblue in the ActivityPub library titled "Getting our hands dirty", which is about project governance, the problem that sent me off on the search that found C4 and spawned C4Social.
library.activitypub.dev/shelve

C4Social was created to solve two problems (not enough developers on the fediverse and slow development pace) with the hypothesis that the Collaborative Code Construction Contract (C4) offered a compelling solution.

Core to the C4 is that code is merged not on its content but on the problem it addresses. So from the first moments, feeding the process meant finding code which addresses valid problems. Upstream is therefore the first place you look鈥 and there we found and merged 35 PRs between the two forks.

As people joined, some concerns were raised with this practice:

* First, that such PRs might be work-in-progress and that by merging code before upstream maintainers, we would be taking on additional risk on a patch which may still receive comments and changes.
* Second, if more changes are made and then the code is then merged upstream, we may have conflicts to resolve which might make merging not worth the extra maintenance.
* Third, the author of the patch may be surprised that their code is used on a fork.

Today, there are another dozen or so PRs to look at so this is a good time throw a question out there. Are there other concerns that should be raised about this practice? If you make PRs, would you want to be pinged by a fork?

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Creating magic through evolution of the Fediverse. Running the C4 fork of Mastodon. C4 is a protocol for asynchronous, non-blocking, distributed, problem-focused software development.